Capita Goes To Court Over Reputational Damage After Death Of Claimant

Capita are worried about damage to their reputation?? Hahahahahaha!

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Benefit-assessment company Capita is going to court to try to reverse the “reputational damage” it says it suffered after a claimant died.

Victoria Smith died months after her personal independence payments were stopped following a Capita assessment.

The outsourcing company was ordered to pay £10,000 in damages over its handling of her disability claim.

It was found to have made incorrect statements but wants the county court verdict set aside and the case reheard.

The company conducts health assessments for personal independence payments (PIP), the main disability benefit, on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions.

While the decision over whether someone receives the benefit is made by a DWP official, Capita’s assessment of how a person’s disability affects their life is a crucial part of the process.

‘She gave up’

A Capita healthcare assistant came to assess Ms Smith in March 2018.

The 33-year-old, from Market Drayton, in…

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Student Creates New Scientific Signs For BSL

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Frustrated at the lack of complex scientific terms in British Sign Language, a Dundee student has created more than 100 new signs to help deaf people express themselves when talking about science.

For any new student, coming into a lecture theatre or a laboratory can be nerve-wracking – especially if you can’t hear.

That was the reality Liam Mcmulkin faced when he began studying life sciences at the University of Dundee in 2015.

Born deaf, Liam was the first person in his family to go to university, after receiving an undergraduate scholarship from The Robertson Trust.

He admitted having fears about what life as a student would be like, particularly when it came to lectures:

“When I applied to university, I was worried about two things,” he told BBC Scotland’s The Nine.

“Firstly, I was at school with 10 other deaf people but now at university, I was the only…

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How Frances Ryan Felt When She Passed PIP Assessment

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Can you be lucky if you get something you deserve? I felt lucky last week as I read the letter informing me I’d been awarded personal independence payments (Pip). Like a couple of million other disabled people, for years I’d received Pip’s predecessor, disability living allowance, without any problems in order to pay for the extra costs of my disability – but it was recently reassessed in the name of “welfare reform”.

It’s the oddest of things, “welfare reform”. You sit there, opposite a stranger, asked to detail the sort of intimacies you’d be reluctant to share with a lifelong friend. “Are there parts of your body you can’t reach to wash? Which ones?” “How do you put your bra on?” You wonder why exactly such lines of questioning are necessary, or how the tens of pages you filled out for hours beforehand weren’t enough, and then explain, as…

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Do My Wheels Look Big In This?

Disabled people want and can enjoy sex…

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This is a guest post by Geek ‘n’ Proud who Tweets @geeknproud42.

Do my wheels look big in this?

Why am I asking this? To clarify, I am not talking about whether your wheelchair, if you use one, has a good fashion sense. However, I am going to discuss a topic which I hope you will find equally, if not more interesting, and that is the potential frustrations that many people with disabilities can face, with respect to sexual and romantic relationships. I speak from the perspective of mainly my personal experiences, and hopefully I will be able to draw some conclusions from it, which may be useful to you.

So, before we start with my story, let’s remember that, although I can tell you what worked for me, there is not one magic bullet that will ensure that everyone who has a disability will have a happy and fulfilled…

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Why being called a medical “enigma” or “puzzle” is not helpful

A blog post on being a medical enigma, how it feels to be labelled as such…

craftyinsomniac

A few days ago I was talking to a friend of mine (who also blogs and can be found at
https://danonwheels.wordpress.com/) and we got onto the subject of doctors, I had had a particularly unhelpful doctors appointment where 95% of my issues and concerns had been dismissed as something that she couldn’t do anything about, now I’m not saying that my GP isn’t good as she is but as usual my complex medical conditions leave her (like me) with nowhere else to turn to get help. Now while this is more than a little annoying it seems it is a regular occurrence, not just for me but for pretty much every other disabled person I know. We were discussing this further and the term “medical enigma” and medical “puzzle” came into it, both of us have heard this on many many occasions, and on those many occasions we had…

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The Taboo Around Disability And Sex Limits Everyone

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There remains a heavy taboo around sex and disability in our culture. Research by the charity Scope found that only 7% of non-disabled people have dated a disabled person, while disabled young people are let down when it comes to sex education, often receiving none at all, or nothing appropriate to their needs.

The writer and activist Penny Pepper, who writes extensively about disability and sex, including in her erotica collection Desires Reborn, told me: “If disabled people aren’t having sex, they would like to. And the reasons they’re not are overwhelmingly to do with the barriers in society. I’ve known quite a few disabled people who [because of this] have resigned themselves to never having sex.”

This isn’t just wrong because of the obvious: sex is fun, enables procreation and for many people is vital for wellbeing. It’s also wrong because it’s part of a…

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A Simple Idea, A Huge Help

Some of you may already know about the Google “doodles”, those renditions of the Google logo on its home page that change from time to time to celebrate great people, works of art, inventions, notable anniversaries and other occasions.  Sometimes the doodle is interactive, containing a small video or game to play but most of the time it is a temporary image which if clicked links to more details of the occasion it has been created to celebrate.

Today’s doodle is an image of a tactile pavement, as seen in cities and towns the world over.  Whilst these areas of paving can be horrendous for wheelchair users, they are an essential tool in safe navigation by blind and partially sighted people and there’s an interesting story behind them.

GoogleDoodle

The inventor of these paving slabs, Japanese man Seiichi Miyake, found out a close friend was losing their ability to see clearly and decided to try and help.  Using his own finances he started development on what he named the Tenji block in 1965, completing development and introducing the blocks in 1967 outside a school for the blind in Japan.

Many people will now be familiar with the “knobbly” or “bumpy” blocks on the approach to road crossings or at railway platforms but there have been other designs used to denote various hazards and to guide blind and partially sighted people in particular directions.

These blocks are a simple idea that became hugely successful as they can be felt either with a cane or through the feet.